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College Savings

Save for 4 years of college with the U.Plan

Use the Maturity Year Selection Guide to find the years your child will attend college, and then designate at least $300 of savings to each year
You probably need to save for college, right? And in most cases, you need to save for 4 years’ worth of expenses. Enter the U.Plan Prepaid Tuition Program. With the U.Plan’s design, you’ll designate the specific years that your child will attend college (we call them maturity years), and by doing so, you’ll have money ready to pay your child’s tuition and mandatory fees in each of those years. It’s a savings plan that sees the whole picture, and can help you reduce the cost for every year your child attends college. Here’s how to get started.

Begin by finding your child’s current school year on our Maturity Year Selection Guide. The guide will provide you the years during which your child will attend college (assuming your child stays on track and doesn’t take a gap year after high school). Those years represent your maturity years – the years during which your U.Plan college savings will become available to help pay your college bill.

As an example, let’s say your child is currently in second grade. By referencing the Maturity Guide, you quickly learn that your child will need funds for the college bill in the four years listed. Therefore, when placing your money into the U.Plan, you need to designate your savings to mature (become ready to spend) in those specific maturity years.

You’ll designate your maturity years when you open a U.Plan account or add funds. You’re not required to save for all four maturity years, but by doing so, you’ll have peace of mind knowing that part of your tuition and mandatory fees for every year of college will already be reduced.

Once you open your U.Plan account and start saving, you’re on your way to significantly reducing your college costs. Want to save in the U.Plan now? Simply create an online account. And to learn more about how the U.Plan works, watch our short explanatory video.





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